Corrugated Boxes

Over 150 sizes in stock for immediate delivery.


Box Style Tutorial

How to measure a corrugated box

Printer Boxes
File Storage
Cube Boxes
Keg Cartons
Multi-Depth
Select by length

Bubble & Foam
Business Card Boxes
Can Liners
Cell Partitions
Corrugated Boxes
Chipboard Mailers
Cornerboard
Corrugated Mailers
Corrugated Pads
Crinkle Cut
Dispensers
Fiber Partitions
Flat Mailers
Foam Corners
Foam-in-place
Kraft Paper
Labels
Loose-fill
Mailing Tubes
Packing List Envelopes
Pallet Jacks
Pallet Wrap
Poly Bags
Poly Mailers
Shrink Film
Single-Face
Stationery Boxes
Strapping
Stretch Film
Tape
Tape & Label Cores
Utility Knives

Contract Packaging

Janitorial Products

Printer & Copy Machine
Supplies ( Excel File )

Driving Directions
Apply for Credit/Terms
Resale Form





Corrugated Flute

What are Corrugated Flutes ?

Architects have known for thousands of years that an arch with the proper curve is the strongest way to span a given space. The inventors of corrugated fiberboard applied this same principle to paperwhen they put arches in the corrugated medium. These arches are known as flutes and when anchored to the linerboard with a starch-based adhesive, they resist bending and pressure from all directions.

When a piece of combined board is placed on its end, the arches form rigid columns, capable of supporting a great deal of weight. When pressure is applied to the side of the board, the space in between the flutes acts as a cushion to protect the container's contents. The flutes also serve as an insulator, providing some product protection from sudden temperature changes. At the same time, the vertical linerboard provides more strength and protects the flutes from damage.

flute

Flutes come in several standard shapes or flute profiles (A, B, C, E, F, etc.). A-flute was the first to be developed and is the largest common flute profile. B-flute was next and is much smaller. C-flute followed and is between A and B in size. E-flute is smaller than B and F-flute is smaller yet.

In addition to these five most common profiles, new flute profiles, both larger and smaller than those listed here, are being created for more specialized boards. Generally, larger flute profiles deliver greater vertical compression strength and cushioning. Smaller flute profiles provide enhanced structural and graphics capabilities for primary (retail) packaging.

Different flute profiles can be combined in one piece of combined board. For instance, in a triple wall board, one layer of medium might be A-flute while the other two layers may be C-flute. Mixing flute profiles in this way allows designers to manipulate the compression strength, cushioning strength and total thickness of the combined board.

Back to Corrugated